Artist Lucy Farley (1982-) lives and works in London.

She studied at Central St. Martins graduating in 2005, and has an MA in printmaking from the Royal College of Art (2009), she recently completed a two-year Fellowship at the Royal Academy. Exhibitions in London have included the ‘Originals’ Printmaking show at the Mall Galleries in London, as well as The Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

“Painting, drawing and printmaking are all part of my practice. I am interested in depicting places that I have a personal connection with or a history that inspires me. My work aims to build up a record of time, spirit of place and changing feelings which occur through travel, my existence in the city and a connection with nature and the landscape. ‘The fragments of memory, past sensations and experiences, that are associated with a particular urban or natural landscape, form the basis of my work.

I am interested in the pictorial  deconstruction  and rearrangement of  landscape,  the figure and still life .Seen and felt experiences , combined with repeated drawing and documentation, allow me to present the subject within a new context  and explore the spirit of place, objects and the human condition in relation to this.

Through this reorganisation on paper and canvas, we as viewers experience a shift in perceived realities and question our mental and physical state within our immediate surroundings.
I am drawn to the tension and play between ‘real and illusory ‘space and spending time in a given place allows imagery to sift into a reference library of remembered forms, which is almost subconscious in it’s operations when I work on  prints , paintings and ceramics back in the studio.

It is important I work in situ on Printmaking plates, paper and drafting film, directly from the landscape , figure or interior.  There is a speed and spontaneity I wish to capture in my original drawings which I can manipulate, but always keep in the finished works.

Drawing is at the heart of everything I make. This in turn leads to working in an array of different  mediums, which is key for me to progress and evolve. It allows a new abstract language to form, which then  questions the construction of the next piece of work ;  ceramic reliefs as 3d objects  for painting, distort initial representations of a subject, which in turn introduce a new approach to printmaking plates that feed back into the painting. It is a continuous experimental circle of thinking through making.

I like to think of these various print, ceramic or drawing constructions as a ‘stage’, a defined area within which static, spatial relationships are set up.

I have always been more interested in the drawings of sculptors and the conversion of a three dimensional image to a flat plane, and the struggle  to convey the full experience of a multi dimensional world.

For this reason, I have always been greatly influenced by the American Abstract Expressionists and the physicality with which they approached their work and  their ‘physical embodiment’ in the paintings themselves.

Scandinavian painters such as Munch, Asger Jorn And Per Kirkeby have inspired my obsession with the particular atmosphere and mystical feel associated with Nordic painting. Growing up with a Danish Mother, I have strong connections with Denmark and regularly return home to study art collections and shows.

There is a romanticism, and love of landscape associated with Danish painters of the fifties that links to the  English neo romantics in post war Britain, such as Keith Vaughan, who has been a huge influence on my practice.

The Melancholy and nostalgia of this particular period in British painting has always  evoked a strong emotional response and played an important role in my own work.
I am interested in the pictorial deconstruction and rearrangement of landscape, the figure and still life. Seen and felt experiences, combined with repeated drawing and documentation, allow me to present the subject within a new context  and explore the spirit of place, objects and the human condition in relation to this. Through this reorganisation on paper and canvas, we as viewers experience a shift in perceived realities and question our mental and physical state within our immediate surroundings.

I am drawn to the tension and play between real and illusory space and spending time in a given place allows imagery to sift into a reference library of remembered forms, which is almost subconscious in it’s operations when I work on  prints , paintings and ceramics back in the studio. It is important I work in situ on Printmaking plates, paper and drafting film, directly from the landscape , figure or interior.  There is a speed and spontaneity I wish to capture in my original drawings which I can manipulate, but always keep in the finished works.
Drawing is at the heart of everything I make. This in turn leads to working in an array of different  mediums, which is key for me to progress and evolve. It allows a new abstract language to form, which then  questions the construction of the next piece of work; ceramic reliefs as 3d objects for painting, distort initial representations of a subject, which in turn introduce a new approach to printmaking plates that feed back into the painting. It is a continuous experimental circle of thinking through making. I like to think of these various print, ceramic or drawing constructions as a ‘stage’, a defined area within which static, spatial relationships are set up.

“I have always been more interested in the drawings of sculptors and the conversion of a three dimensional image to a flat plane, and the struggle  to convey the full experience of a multi dimensional world. For this reason, I have always been greatly influenced by the American Abstract Expressionists and the physicality with which they approached their work and  their ‘physical embodiment’ in the paintings themselves. Scandinavian painters such as Munch, Asger Jorn And Per Kirkeby have inspired my obsession with the particular atmosphere and mystical feel associated with Nordic painting. Growing up with a Danish Mother, I have strong connections with Denmark and regularly return home to study art collections and shows. There is a romanticism,  and love of landscape associated with Danish painters of the fifties that links to the  English neo romantics in post-war Britain, such as Keith Vaughan, who has been a huge influence on my practice. The melancholy and nostalgia of this particular period in British painting has always  evoked a strong emotional response and played an important role in my own work.” – Lucy Farley

‘Visitor’s Song’ is an enchanting Limited Edition Silkscreen Print by contemporary artist Lucy Farley

Price: £575

Limited edition of 100

This gorgeous piece of art is a screenprint with glazes and is an artists proof which is signed & numbered by the artist.

‘Visitor’s Song’ reflects on the 1927 silent film ‘Sunrise:A Song of Two Humans’ by FW Murnau and the dramatic shifts and jolts in a relationship between two humans and their incapability of fully knowing and predicting the behaviour of the other.

‘Murnau’s film highlights the contrasts in human behaviour that can range from both ends of the spectrum and emphasises the instability of the ‘human condition’ and what we are capable of. The writer Emile Zola, depicted these very circumstances and places in his novels, which brought out ‘the beast in man’ and have also been an inspiration for my new work. This portrait is part of a larger series, based on my preoccupation with the ‘possession of space’, both mentally and physically and the human need to reclaim our territory, whether it be against each other, in nature, or in the virtual world. Frida Kahlo’s self-portraits with hummingbirds are referenced and the symbolism of the Hummgbird in Native American mythology through ‘the visitor’ in my portrait. ‘A Song of Two Humans’ belongs to a lost time, being one of the last in the era of silent film and I wanted to echo this feeling in the work- of a time that has escaped us, never to be regained.’ – Lucy Farley

2015

74x98cm

‘To the Lighthouse, Ile de Re’ is a striking Limited Edition Silkscreen Print by contemporary artist Lucy Farley

Price: £690

Limited edition of 100

This energetic piece of art is an artists proof which is signed & numbered by the artist.

‘To the Lighthouse, Ile de Ré’ showcases Lucy Farley’s fresh and dynamic take on nature, landscape and the spirit of place. Romantic and windswept, Lucy Farley’s sweeping lines and washes of colour draw the viewer into this coastal scene of lighthouse, boats, ominous sky and swelling water. She combines a tremendous sense of atmosphere with a modernity and minimalism that reflects her personal connection with the landscape. The title of this piece reminds us of the novel of the same name by Virginia Woolf, and indeed the flow of line and colour is reminiscent of Woolf’s stream-of-consciousness style of writing.

“This screenprint was made in exactly the same way my sketchbook pages are built up; drawing and painting outside and observing the subject throughout the day- watching the light change. I aim to capture the drama and force of these changeable elements at sea. Sheets of large drafting film were placed directly on the sand in front of me as I captured  with crayons and washes, layer by layer ,the tide coming in and surrounding the lighthouse. I have a strong connection with the West Coast of France where my parents live on an Island and I have been brought up on boats my whole life sailing with them. Many hours have been spent walking around the Island with my sketchbooks in winter and summer. It is important  that spontaneous sketches,on the spot, merge into the large finished works and embody that spirit and liveliness.” – Lucy Farley

2013

127x102cm

‘Stroud Low Moon’ is a captivating Limited Edition Silkscreen Print by contemporary artist Lucy Farley

Price: £690

Limited edition of 100

This piece of screenprint art is a handfinished with glazes and continues Lucy’s lyrical and atmospheric exploration of the English landscape.

“Stroud Low Moon is part of a series of recent work based on the Gloucestershire landscape and the re-connection of the Cotswold canals in Stroud Valley, the Thames & Severn with the Stroudwater Navigation. My Walks in the valleys are documented in my sketchbooks in a variety of mixed media. The image is built up from many different drawings done on the spot, which contribute to the collected fragments of imagery and atmosphere in the final piece. De Kooning has continued to be an inspiration for these pieces, along with the tradition of the British neo-romantics (Keith Vaughan, Graham Sutherland) and their very individual portrayal of the same landscapes.” – Lucy Farley

‘Stroud Low Moon’ is signed & numbered by the artist and comes from an edition of 100.

2014

136x102cm