Kenny Laurenson’s artworks are about rediscovery, finding and exploring a new 21st century perspective. Taking something so essentially three dimensional and reinterpreting it in two dimensions required me to bring more than a single dimension to an image. There is no true symmetry in Kenny Laurenson’s art. As in the human face, perfect symmetry holds no beauty, and so he twists and balance his imagery in photomontage to create a harmony whilst retaining the compelling nature of a symmetrical first impression.

“The satisfaction I felt when first creating the photomontages in this series reminded me of my childhood and treasured kaleidoscope. The toy kaleidoscope is a marvel as it enables a new and compelling perspective on something possibly familiar or ordinary. The first thing we do after looking at something through a kaleidoscope is to look again at the subject without the kaleidoscope, as if to rediscover the subject, and see it anew. This simple psychology is essential to my work… I endeavour to create images that demand more than a glance.” – Kenny Laurenson

Education:

Exhibitions:

‘London Triumph Quadriga No.1’ is an archival reverse print onto aluminium from photographer & artist Kenny Laurenson.

Price: £2950

Limited edition of 16

Archival reverse photographic print onto aluminium

100x100cm

Signed & numbered by the artist

Thousands of people pass by the Wellington Arch on London’s Hyde Park Corner every day, yet few give more than a glance to the giant quadriga standing proudly above it. The sculptor, Adrian Jones, a former army veterinary captain, specialised in animal figures and exhibited a magnificent plaster group at the Royal Academy entitled ‘Triumph’. The Prince of Wales was so impressed that he suggested that this quadriga would make a suitable adornment for the rebuilt Wellington Arch, and so it was commissioned.
A banker and philanthropist, Sir Herbert Stern, donated £20,000 and in 1908 Jones set to work on the full size version in his Chelsea studio with Edward VII taking personal interest. The chariot of war features Nike, the winged Goddess of Victory. The intriguing figure of a boy driving the horses was in fact modelled on Stern’s ten year old son. The final bronze sculpture was unveiled in 1912. The statue is also notable in being the largest bronze sculpture in Europe.

Statues are not only beautiful but carry with them stories. Classical statues were in a sense the feature films, the blockbusters, of their day at a time when books and paintings were a rare luxury of the privileged. On display for all to see, the unveiling of statues were major events and word of mouth passed on for generations who would travel to cities to see these wonders.

The immortality of statues reflects our human aspirations. Today, although society have become oblivious to such statues they still retain a gravitas and eternal value. They may be taken for granted yet one would surely notice if they were removed. Could we ever dispose of them?.. I think not and that they are destined to become ever more valuable, yet around the world they stand ignored and exposed to the elements.

Kenny Laurenson’s fascination is also in their symbolism. Most statues are embedded with allegorical meaning whilst the story of their creation always plays an important part in the final rendition.

Kenny has embedded further depth into the final piece intending that they should be viewed from a distance, mid range or close up with entirely different effect.

Kenny Laurenson’s photomontage series ‘Statuesque’ expresses a long fascination with perception. “Statues in cities are so often almost invisible yet they depict powerful stories and characters from an era when visual information was so rare. Statues have gravity, beauty, craft and hold an eternal value, as symbolic of immortality as anything we create. I endeavour to bring them new context, new life, new perspective”. Kenny Laurenson takes a traditional dark room approach, a crafted ‘dodge and burn’ technique, utilising digital technology.

‘George & Dragon, Berlin No. 1’ is an archival reverse print onto aluminium from photographer & artist Kenny Laurenson.

Price: £2950

Limited edition of 16

Archival reverse photographic print onto aluminium

100x100cm

Signed & numbered by the artist

The legend of Saint George and the dragon is one of the oldest mythical, romantic stories and originates in 10th century Libya. St. George fights and kills a dragon to save a Princess. First he struck the monster with his spear but the dragon’s scales were so hard that the spear broke into a thousand pieces. He fell from his horse but rolled under an enchanted orange tree against which poison could not prevail, so that the venomous dragon was unable to hurt him. Recovering his strength he smote the beast with his sword, but the dragon poured poison on him and his armour split in two. Once more he refreshed himself from the orange tree and back on horseback with sword in hand, he rushed at the dragon and pierced it under the wing where there were no scales… it fell dead at his feet.
This simply became the most epic of stories for hundreds of years. and consequently there are numerous renditions across the world in words, art and sculpture. Saint George was the ultimate hero and the popular favourite among Saints across many cultures and continents.

Kenny Laurenson has been captivated not only by the story itself and the portrayals but also by the profound realisation of what it must have meant to ordinary people so long ago. Today we turn the greatest stories into paperbacks and feature films but still they may not last a century whereas this simple but powerful story of bravery and chivalry has lasted hundreds of years and during that time would have been known to everyone. A story that anyone could retell and yet over the last 100 years or so it’s been forgotten as we have become immersed in storytelling through imagery, print and film. “I hope this story can continue in my work, as I combine an intended ambiguity along with clear references of the legend.” – Kenny Laurenson
Through photomontage technique Kenny Laurenson has endeavoured to bring the subjects a new life and a new perspective for the viewer.

The Berlin Statue of St. George fighting the dragon is a magnificent piece created in 1853 by the German sculptor August Kiss. It originally adorned a courtyard of the Stadtschloss, the majestic Berlin city palace though now occupies a spot on a small square near the river Spree.
The unveiling would have been a major event and word of mouth passed on for generations who would travel far to see this wonder of the world.

The immortality of statues reflects our human aspiration. Today, although society have become oblivious to such statues they still retain a gravitas and eternal value. They may be taken for granted in our fast urban environments yet one would surely notice if they were removed. Could we ever dispose of them?.. I think not. They are destined to become ever more valuable, yet around the world they stand ignored and exposed to the elements.

Kenny Laurenson has embedded further depth into the final piece intending that they should be viewed from a distance, mid range or close up with entirely different effect.

Kenny Laurenson’s photomontage series ‘Statuesque’ expresses a long fascination with perception. “Statues in cities are so often almost invisible yet they depict powerful stories and characters from an era when visual information was so rare. Statues have gravity, beauty, craft and hold an eternal value, as symbolic of immortality as anything we create. I endeavour to bring them new context, new life, new perspective”. Kenny Laurenson takes a traditional dark room approach, a crafted ‘dodge and burn’ technique, utilising digital technology.

‘George & Dragon, London No. 1’ is an archival reverse print onto aluminium from photographer & artist Kenny Laurenson.

Price: £2950

Limited edition of 16

Archival reverse photographic print onto aluminium

100x100cm

Signed & numbered by the artist

The legend of Saint George and the dragon is one of the oldest mythical, romantic stories and originates in 10th century Libya. St. George fights and kills a dragon to save a Princess. First he struck the monster with his spear but the dragon’s scales were so hard that the spear broke into a thousand pieces. He fell from his horse but rolled under an enchanted orange tree against which poison could not prevail, so that the venomous dragon was unable to hurt him. Recovering his strength he smote the beast with his sword, but the dragon poured poison on him and his armour split in two. Once more he refreshed himself from the orange tree and back on horseback with sword in hand, he rushed at the dragon and pierced it under the wing where there were no scales… it fell dead at his feet.
This simply became the most epic of stories for hundreds of years. and consequently there are numerous renditions across the world in words, art and sculpture. Saint George was the ultimate hero and the popular favourite among Saints across many cultures and continents.

Kenny Laurenson has been captivated not only by the story itself and the portrayals but also by the profound realisation of what it must have meant to ordinary people so long ago. Today we turn the greatest stories into paperbacks and feature films but still they may not last a century whereas this simple but powerful story of bravery and chivalry has lasted hundreds of years and during that time would have been known to everyone. A story that anyone could retell and yet over the last 100 years or so it’s been forgotten as we have become immersed in storytelling through imagery, print and film. “I hope this story can continue in my work, as I combine an intended ambiguity along with clear references of the legend.” – Kenny Laurenson
Through photomontage technique Kenny Laurenson has endeavoured to bring the subjects a new life and a new perspective for the viewer.

This statue can be found on Lords roundabout in St. Johns Wood, North London and is by the sculptor C. L. Hartwell. The statue sits above a WW1 memorial. The unveiling would have been a major event.
The immortality of statues reflects our human aspiration. Today, although society have become oblivious to such statues they still retain a gravitas and eternal value. They may be taken for granted in our fast urban environments yet one would surely notice if they were removed. Could we ever dispose of them?.. I think not. They are destined to become ever more valuable, yet around the world they stand ignored and exposed to the elements.

Kenny has embedded further depth into the final piece intending that they should be viewed from a distance, mid range or close up with entirely different effect.

Kenny Laurenson’s photomontage series ‘Statuesque’ expresses a long fascination with perception. “Statues in cities are so often almost invisible yet they depict powerful stories and characters from an era when visual information was so rare. Statues have gravity, beauty, craft and hold an eternal value, as symbolic of immortality as anything we create. I endeavour to bring them new context, new life, new perspective”. Kenny Laurenson takes a traditional dark room approach, a crafted ‘dodge and burn’ technique, utilising digital technology.

‘London Statue – Prince Albert Memorial’ is an archival reverse print onto aluminium from photographer & artist Kenny Laurenson.

Price: £2950

Limited edition of 16

Archival reverse photographic print onto alumini

100x100cm

Signed & numbered by the artist

Unveiled in 1872, The Albert Memorial commemorates the death of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s husband, who died of typhoid fever at the age of 42.

At a cost of over £10,000,000 in today’s terms the 54m high memorial has a huge gilt bronze statue of Albert in a seated position looking south towards the Royal Albert Hall.

The ornate canopy, in the style of a Gothic ciborium, has marble figures standing at each corner.

These huge statues featuring four figures and a beast of burden representative of the four major continents (Africa, America, Europe, and Asia).  Africa is represented by a camel which is actually a fountain that spits on you just like a real camel.

Thousands of people pass by the Prince Albert Memorial in London’s Kensington Gardens every day, yet few give more than a glance to the four statues standing at each corner. The corner statue representing Africa is featured in this piece of art by Kenny Laurenson.

The sculptor, William Theed, the son of the sculptor and painter William Theed the elder, specialised in portraiture, and his services were extensively used by the Royal Family.

Statues are not only beautiful but carry with them stories. Classical statues were in a sense the feature films, the blockbusters, of their day at a time when books and paintings were a rare luxury of the privileged. On display for all to see, the unveiling of statues were major events and word of mouth passed on for generations who would travel to cities to see these wonders.

The immortality of statues reflects our human aspirations. Today, although society have become oblivious to such statues they still retain a gravitas and eternal value. They may be taken for granted yet one would surely notice if they were removed. Could we ever dispose of them?.. I think not and that they are destined to become ever more valuable, yet around the world they stand ignored and exposed to the elements.

Kenny Laurenson’s fascination is also in their symbolism. Most statues are embedded with allegorical meaning whilst the story of their creation always plays an important part in the final rendition.

Kenny has embedded further depth into the final piece intending that they should be viewed from a distance, mid range or close up with entirely different effect.

Kenny Laurenson’s photomontage series ‘Statuesque’ expresses a long fascination with perception. “Statues in cities are so often almost invisible yet they depict powerful stories and characters from an era when visual information was so rare. Statues have gravity, beauty, craft and hold an eternal value, as symbolic of immortality as anything we create. I endeavour to bring them new context, new life, new perspective”. Kenny Laurenson takes a traditional dark room approach, a crafted ‘dodge and burn’ technique, utilising digital technology.

‘Venice Quadriga No.1’ is an archival reverse print onto aluminium from photographer & artist Kenny Laurenson.

Price: £2950

Limited edition of 16

Archival reverse photographic print onto aluminium

Signed & numbered by the artist

The bronze Horses of Saint Mark, also known as the Triumphal Quadriga, can be found on the facade of St Mark’s Basilica in Venice. The sculptures date from around 4th century BC. They arrived in Venice from Constantinople in 1204. In 1797, Napoleon had the horses forcibly removed from the basilica and carried off to Paris, where they were used in the design of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel together with a quadriga. In 1815 the horses were returned to Venice by Captain Dumaresq who fought at the Battle of Waterloo.

These overwhelmingly beautiful sculptures are from a time we can hardly imagine, when art and sculpture was a rarity enjoyed only by the rich. Nobody knows who commissioned them, created them, or their original purpose and place. But today they still exist and display incredible craft and design.
Most statues are allegorical depictions of stories, people or events. Somewhat like a great book or movie of our cultural era, these monumental immortal works were the great stories of their era and their unveilings would have seen thousands attend in awe.

“With such profound, mysterious beauty I was captivated and endeavoured to continue their aesthetic story. My work is a reinvention in a medium unimaginable even a few hundred years ago.” – Kenny Laurenson

Kenny Laurenson’s photomontage series ‘Statuesque’ expresses a long fascination with perception. “Statues in cities are so often almost invisible yet they depict powerful stories and characters from an era when visual information was so rare. Statues have gravity, beauty, craft and hold an eternal value, as symbolic of immortality as anything we create. I endeavour to bring them new context, new life, new perspective”. Kenny Laurenson takes a traditional dark room approach, a crafted ‘dodge and burn’ technique, utilising digital technology.